Health & Wellbeing

Do you have ‘sneez-iety’? Research reveals nose health anxiety

Australia’s sneezing anxiety
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Research reveals that 53 per cent of Australians can experience anxiety when they sneeze whilst out in public. 

Coined ‘sneez-iety’, the research reveals many people’s nose health can compromise all the essential ingredients that make a perfect night out, including mood (55 per cent), appetite (46 per cent), and even sex drive (22 per cent) thanks to a blocked nose. 

Weddings or christening ceremonies top the list of the most embarrassing scenarios for Australians to sneeze during followed by playing cupid on a date or flying high in the sky. 

The research commissioned in 2022 by FESS® is most concerning to the 4.6 million Australians who suffer from hay fever.

Sneezing-into-elbow
Weddings or christening ceremonies top the list of the most embarrassing scenarios for Australians to sneeze during followed by playing cupid on a date or flying high in the sky. (Credit: Getty)

Dr Zac Turner, a medical practitioner who specialises in preventative health and wellness, highlights the importance of keeping your nose health in check. 

It is not just social occasions that cause Aussies sneez-iety but also the workplace with four in ten respondents (39 per cent) embarrassed to sneeze during a client meeting or presenting something important (35 per cent).  

The research shows that almost all respondents think they understand the role their nose plays in overall well-being but the research found that while 84 per cent believe their sleep is negatively impacted by having a blocked nose, only 47 per cent believe their energy levels were affected despite the two being inextricably linked.

woman-sneezing
It is not just social occasions that cause Aussies sneez-iety but also the workplace. (Credit: Getty) (Credit: Getty)

Adele Taylor National, Asthma Council Australia’s Sensitive Choice, Program Manager said, “[Medically diagnosed] asthma and allergies go hand in hand – up to four out of five people with asthma also have allergies like hay fever and an itchy, runny or blocked nose due to allergies can make your asthma harder to control”.

“This is just another reason why it’s so important to manage hay fever and reduce triggers as much as possible, so this November, if you think you are allergic, speak to your doctor to help identify exactly what triggers your allergies and how you can best manage this,” said Adele Taylor. 


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